Brilliant Gift Ideas For Science Fans

Purchasing gifts for science lovers can sometimes be tricky, but this handy guide will help you identify the coolest gifts available!

Galilea Moon Phase Clock

$88.15

Tired of clocks that only tell the time on a 12 hour scale? This clock isn’t so short-sighted and will also visually represent the current phase of the moon during its 29.5 day cycle. In addition to being a cool conversation piece, this clock can also help when planning skywatching excursions to ensure the moon won’t wash out the objects being targeted! Get it here.

23 and Me profile

$99

Many people are possibly aware of their ancestry, but this DNA analysis goes back thousands of years to identify regions that influenced the 23 chromosomes that make up each of us. This can also help find distant cousins and other relatives who use the program, making an incredibly large and detailed family tree. Get your profile here.

Periodic table of the elements shower curtain.

$29.99

This semi-transparent shower curtain makes a great addition to any bathroom. Colorful squares make it easy to segregate metals, transition metals, metalloids, and nonmetals. This is perfect for chemistry students or anyone who wants to look up soap and shampoo ingredients while they lather up! Get your own shower curtain here.

Ecosphere

$55.99

EcoSpheres are completely self-contained environments for marine shrimp that provide food and recycle waste, virtually eliminating any responsibility on the human’s end. As long as the ball is receiving the specified amount of sunlight, the shrimp will live for at least six months, with many living a few years with proper care. Get your own ecosphere here.

Meteorite

Price varies

Meteorites are the remnants of comets and asteroids that didn’t entirely burn up in the atmosphere and actually made it to Earth’s surface. The composition of the meteorites depend on the identity of the parent body. Price of the meteorite varies based on abundance and material. This gift is truly (wait for it)… out of this world. Pick up your own meteorite here.

Constellation bow tie.

$42

If the Eleventh Doctor taught us anything, it’s that bow ties are cool. This 100% silk bow tie is especially cool because it features constellations visible in the night sky of the Northern Hemisphere, including Casseopeia, Scorpius, Ursa Minor with Polaris, and more. This bowtie needs to be self-tied and does not come pre-tied. It’s a classy yet fun addition for formal occasions! Available here.

Quadcopter

$59.99

Drones are all the rage right now, and this quadcopter is perfect for beginners. This features a 6 axis gyro in order to provide better balance and maneuverability. This model also features a built-in video camera. NOTE: Many local governments have limitations regarding the use of drones, so please ensure it is used within the scope of the law. Get your own drone here.

Bone clones

Price varies

Whether you’re buying for a medical student or paleoanthropologist, Bone Clones is a source of great anatomical reproductions. The store contains everything from animal bones to modern human skeletons to reproductions of ancient hominids like Australopithecus afarensis, better known as “Lucy” (pictured). Get your own skull here.

Gallium

$16.40 for 20 grams

Gallium is a chemical element with the atomic number 31. It is a silvery metal with a melting point that is fairly low, at 29.76 °C (85.57 °F). This means that body heat is enough to melt the metal, leaving a silvery puddle that is just as fun to play with as mercury, but without all of that pesky toxicity! Get your own gallium here.

Pi fruit bowl

$118

Fruit baskets might not have the best reputation, but that’s probably because they usually come in an ugly wicker basket that gets tossed out soon after receiving it. Kick things up a notch by using this brushed metal bowl that celebrates pi, everyone’s favorite irrational number! Get yours here.

[Header image credit: Jonas Nordlund via Flickr, CC BY SA 2.0]

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/science-gift-ideas

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