What’s so intriguing about Hamilton sharing the $10 bill with a woman? History.

It was just announced that Alexander Hamilton will share the $10 bill with a woman
when the bill is redesigned in 2020. There’s no word on which woman it will be, but it’s happening.

The conversation started with the WomenOn20s campaign, which listed the top three female candidates: Harriet Tubman, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Rosa Parks.

Hours after the news broke, Tony Award-winner Lin-Manuel Miranda who wrote
an entire Broadway musical devoted to the life of Alexander Hamilton, so you could say he kinda knows his stuff had some interesting perspectives. Historical perspectives.

The news of the $10 bill is eerily an extension of the duel for attention between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton.

In a crazy continuation of history, Burr would be a happy camper. Because he is finally getting his way. Alexander Hamilton will have to stand down just a little bit. The duel goes on.

If you remember your history class notes correctly, Burr killed Hamilton, America’s first Treasury secretary, who helped develop America’s financial system, in a duel in New Jersey.

“I hope they put Eliza” on the new $10, Miranda wrote on Twitter.

Who was Eliza? Eliza was Hamilton’s widow. After Hamilton was killed in the duel, Eliza founded an orphanage in Hamilton’s honor.

The “10 dollar founding father lyric” Miranda mentions is one of the most iconic lines from this musical (which features hip-hop, modern dance, the guy from “Glee” dressed like King George, and a Thomas Jefferson jazz number … and also your tears because it’s a great musical).

Miranda went on to note that Aaron Burr, who shot Hamilton, was kind of a feminist.

Burr is said to have introduced his only daughter, Theodosia, to Mary Wollstonecraft’s book, “A Vindication of the Rights of Women.”

Imagine Burr, who famously wanted Hamilton to disappear (and then kinda made sure that happened with the whole killing-him thing), hearing the news about the $10 bill.

Hey. It’s an honor to share the $10 bill with the first woman on U.S. paper currency. Don’t forget that.

Hamilton was famously introspective, intellectual, and argumentative. I bet he’d be interested in mulling, debating, and writing a LOT of pamphlets about this news.

He might have a few questions:

Like, why does the first woman on American paper currency have to share a bill? This is a guy who famously helped lead America to a nation independent from the British monarchy. I’d like to imagine that he’dt be interested in some separate bill real estate for the ladies.

And um, how did the murderous Jackson manage to stay on the $20 bill? Hamilton did not like Andrew Jackson. He also had a HUGE ego. Just sayin’.

When are we replacing “the mass murderer on your $20,” Andrew Jackson?

For a sense of just how book-smart and confrontational Hamilton was, here’s the rap that Lin-Manuel Miranda performed at the White House that started the whole hip-hop history ball rolling.

It’s told from the perspective of Aaron Burr, and it’s about the beginning of the life of Alexander Hamilton.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/whats-so-intriguing-about-hamilton-sharing-the-10-bill-with-a-woman-history?c=tpstream

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